A2: Microbes in the News

Title: Microbes that live in fishes slimy mucus coating could lead chemists to antibiotic drugs

Source: The Conversation Academic Rigor, journalistic flair

Date: March 31st 2019

https://theconversation.com/microbes-that-live-in-fishes-slimy-mucus-coating-could-lead-chemists-to-new-antibiotic-drugs-114278

Finding new sources of antibiotics has become critically important in recent years in order to combat drug resistant infections. One potential source is fish mucus that covers their bodies in pill form since it is a natural anti-infective. Over 33,000 species of fish have the microbial containing the slime that can protect them from diseases and bacteria and potentially used to help humans with this as well.

In class we have discussed antibiotic sources and working around antibiotic resistance. We have looked at how different natural microbes can help with fighting off diseases and not have a resistance already built up.

I found the article to be well written and very scientifically relevant. They referenced their research at Oregon State University and the ways they have classified the different bacteria they have found taxonomic groups. They found 47 different bacterial strains gathered for the swabs they did on the fish mucus. They carried out a process similar to what we have done in lab to isolate and test them.

What do you think about using natural anti-infectives from animals to combat human pathogens?

1 Comment for “A2: Microbes in the News”

dsbohan

says:

That is interesting. Has it been tested yet in human subjects? I feel like our immune system would naturally take defense to this foreign fish-slime since it is not native to our own system. If this works, that would be really cool. Something needs to be done about the antibiotic resistant problem because we are starting to run out of options. Something I am super interested in is phage-therapy. Since bacteriophages are very specific to certain bacteria, they are studying this as a way to target pathogenic bacteria without adding to the growing issue of super-bugs. I look forward to hearing more about this research as it unfolds!

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