A2: Microbes in the News – New Anti-CRISPR Proteins in Soil Bacteria

Article and Link: New anti-CRISPR proteins discovered in soil and human gut (ScienceDaily)  https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190205144338.htm

Summary: CRISPR is a natural bacterial immune defence, but some bacteriophages (or viruses) have developed anti-CRISPR genes that cause bacteria to lose immune defence when infected. New anti-CRISPR proteins were discovered by using protein functionality tested across a variety of environments, rather than using DNA and culturing. Their discovery could lead to the development of better technologies in the emerging field of CRISPR gene editing.

Connections: This article demonstrates the prevalence and possible uses for bacteria in today’s medical world. If bacteria could be used to produce proteins that create more precise gene editing with CRISPR, gene editing may have a very real future in human society. The way the researchers discovered new anti-CRISPR proteins is also a testament to the diversity of microbial life and how not all microbes can be cultured.

Critical analysis:  I find this article fascinating, because I am very interested in how cellular function, protein production and genetics can be used in the medical world to produce new treatments, drugs and cures for disease. With improved CRISPR technology, it may be more realistic to use gene editing to treat diseases such as cystic fibrosis. Unfortunately, this article was not very well written and did not explain the methods of the researchers in a way that is accessible to the public. The writing was very hard to follow and I had to read it multiple times before I began to understand the premise of the article. However, from my level of understanding there were no factual inaccuracies even though it oversimplified genetic editing and the way CRISPR works.

Question: How does the presence of anti-CRISPR genes in bacteria affect their susceptibility to antibiotics? Could they be more susceptible since anti-CRISPR proteins target bacteria’s “immune systems’?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.